Levente, 18, UK
Computer Science student and KCL who dances salsa & bachata, watches endless TV shows and reads books after books in his free time. In a relationship.
------------------------------------- Series:
Lost
Heroes
Married
Stargate
New Girl
Revenge
Being Erica
Doctor Who
Suburgatory
2 Broke Girls
Supernatural
Inbetweeners
Walking Dead
Big Bang Theory
Game of Thrones
My Wife and Kids
Person of Interest
Friday Night Dinner
Star Trek Enterprise
Rules of Engagement
How I met Your Mother

Books:
Winnetou
Divergent
Inheritance
Game of Thrones
Lord of The Rings
Looking for Alaska
The Hunger Games
Beautiful Creatures
The Mortal Instruments
Girl With the Dragon- Tattoo

15th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Love the sinner, because he is you with 165 notes

dunwall:

the big bad wolf wasnt always that bad

dunwall:

the big bad wolf wasnt always that bad

15th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Mildly Interesting with 97,563 notes

Source: graffquotes

15th July 2014

Post reblogged from Mildly Interesting with 369,744 notes

openlyawesome:

openlyawesome:

openlyawesome:

openlyawesome:

openlyawesome:

someone’s building an actual Krusty Krab less than 6 miles from where i live

no really, it’s in construction

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it’s coming along nicely

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they put up the flags

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Updates:

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image

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image

Source: openlyawesome

15th July 2014

Post reblogged from I'm Bart Simpson, who the hell are you? with 163,784 notes

transhumanisticpanspermia:

i have limited sympathy for people who get told “no” after a public proposal because public proposals are pretty much emotionally abusive

like seriously

if you think it’s kinda cute, you can discuss it beforehand and then do a staged one later

but putting someone on the spot in front of a crowd of strangers (or worse, friends) and demanding they give you a yes or no answer to a complex question which will affect the rest of their life is

really not okay

Source: transhumanisticpanspermia

15th July 2014

Post reblogged from Warning: I'm weird with 245,604 notes

jumpingjaverts:

angelshavethephonebox:

richard-sp8-jr:

in first period a girl got dress coded for wearing a tank top with a jacket over it and this scrawny little boy stood up and yelled “OH MY GOD SHE HAS SKIN THE SKIN IS TOO MUCH FOR ME HER SHOULDERS ARE BEAUTIFUL THIS IS TOO MUCH” and the teacher got so annoyed with him that she didn’t get to dress coding her

Yes.

Good.

You go, boy.

you have literally no idea how many people comment on my post saying “pre-serum steve” its great

Source: jumpingjaverts

15th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from What is this dark place?? with 281,693 notes

lizthefangirl:

themetaisawesome:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

penis-hilton:

same

I’m convinced that all these posts were made by Draco Malfoy

Ditto

can i have detention 

Source: micdotcom

15th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from just one fan girl's screams with 798,766 notes

let-it-golaf:

pixiedust-paycheck:

glorychildren:

NO PHOTOSET HAS MADE ME HAPPIER.

MY FAVORITE PHOTOSET IS BACK

I WILL NEVER NOT LOVE THIS PHOTSET

Source: iraffiruse

15th July 2014

Post reblogged from Mildly Interesting with 822,942 notes

n0ell333:

theargylegargoyle:

death-by-anime:

To all those 12.9 year-olds on Tumblr,

I think we all know where you really belong:

image

I think you should shut the fuck up

we RP smut. I do it all the fucking time.

We write fanfics.

We love yuri and yaoi.

We have dirty minds.

Looks like we misjudged those 12.9 year olds.

image

im dying

Source: dafthappiness

15th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Warning: I'm weird with 211,660 notes

holysheerios:

holysheerios:

teddysfotos:

i just

I’m so sorry

PLEASE STOP REBLOGGING THIS I DONT REALLY KNOW WHAT A MANGO IS BUT IT SEEMED LIKE A GOOD IDEA AT THE TIME

Source: teddysfotos

15th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Be Brave [SEMI-HIATUS] with 2,200 notes

m-o-o-n-l-i-g-h-t-o-f-l-i-e-s:

I have to say something.
Everywhere, it’s a norm to teach children how to use the microwave and how to count their money — how many cents equal a dollar. My friend’s paternal family are in Gaza. She went to visit them a few years ago. When she came back, she told us about things she did with her cousins. Her aunts and uncles and her grandmother. It was the normal things you do with your relatives, you know? Except for the part where they drop to the ground when hearing an explosion nearby. They do it like it’s as natural as breathing, like it’s an everyday routine. It’s so casual, nothing new, to watch the house right next to yours being blown into pieces. Children in Palestine know the right position to be in during a nearby bombarding. And it’s not just that your house can cave in on you while having lunch that’s a norm. It’s a norm for a couple of Israeli soldiers to get into your house, take all your belongings, hit you in the head with the butts of their guns, and leave like they’re walking out a restaurant. It’s a norm to leave your house and never come back. Men and women and children in Palestine live in homes that can’t shelter them. But do they live in fear? No, they don’t. And that’s sickening. Why? Because being blown to pieces while walking on the pavement is as natural there as being approached by a mosquito. Your child is going to school, but they might never come back. Your husband’s going to work so he could afford dinner for you, but he might never come back. And you’ll have to suck it up and be okay with it and move on, because it’s a norm, and there’s nothing you can do about it. And there’s no one to care and no one to help you. It’s disgusting how even here in the rest of the Middle East, people are gathered in coffee shops watching Argentina vs Netherlands and ignoring what’s happening to their brothers and sisters in Gaza and the cities near Gaza. I see a lot of things. I see beautiful posts about acts of kindness, with hundreds of thousands of notes. I see a lot of things on Tumblr that make me feel like my faith in humanity isn’t a stupid thing I convince myself with for comfort. But look at this post. It’s about my relatives and my friends’ families and strangers who are dying in their own homes for absolutely no reason. It’s about children and young people having their lives taken and loved ones taken. It’s about a people who never knew peace, who get accused of terrorism and awful actions when in fact they’re walking in a world where wolves are out to get them and no hunters care to look their way, to offer a helping hand. I know you won’t reblog this post. But why? Please tell me why. Why are the lives of these people — not only the ones lost, but the ones existing in suffering — less important than the world cup or Dean in gym shorts? Why are you scrolling past this?

m-o-o-n-l-i-g-h-t-o-f-l-i-e-s:

I have to say something.

Everywhere, it’s a norm to teach children how to use the microwave and how to count their money — how many cents equal a dollar. My friend’s paternal family are in Gaza. She went to visit them a few years ago. When she came back, she told us about things she did with her cousins. Her aunts and uncles and her grandmother. It was the normal things you do with your relatives, you know? Except for the part where they drop to the ground when hearing an explosion nearby. They do it like it’s as natural as breathing, like it’s an everyday routine. It’s so casual, nothing new, to watch the house right next to yours being blown into pieces. Children in Palestine know the right position to be in during a nearby bombarding. And it’s not just that your house can cave in on you while having lunch that’s a norm. It’s a norm for a couple of Israeli soldiers to get into your house, take all your belongings, hit you in the head with the butts of their guns, and leave like they’re walking out a restaurant. It’s a norm to leave your house and never come back. Men and women and children in Palestine live in homes that can’t shelter them. But do they live in fear? No, they don’t. And that’s sickening. Why? Because being blown to pieces while walking on the pavement is as natural there as being approached by a mosquito. Your child is going to school, but they might never come back. Your husband’s going to work so he could afford dinner for you, but he might never come back. And you’ll have to suck it up and be okay with it and move on, because it’s a norm, and there’s nothing you can do about it. And there’s no one to care and no one to help you. It’s disgusting how even here in the rest of the Middle East, people are gathered in coffee shops watching Argentina vs Netherlands and ignoring what’s happening to their brothers and sisters in Gaza and the cities near Gaza. I see a lot of things. I see beautiful posts about acts of kindness, with hundreds of thousands of notes. I see a lot of things on Tumblr that make me feel like my faith in humanity isn’t a stupid thing I convince myself with for comfort. But look at this post. It’s about my relatives and my friends’ families and strangers who are dying in their own homes for absolutely no reason. It’s about children and young people having their lives taken and loved ones taken. It’s about a people who never knew peace, who get accused of terrorism and awful actions when in fact they’re walking in a world where wolves are out to get them and no hunters care to look their way, to offer a helping hand. I know you won’t reblog this post. But why? Please tell me why. Why are the lives of these people — not only the ones lost, but the ones existing in suffering — less important than the world cup or Dean in gym shorts? Why are you scrolling past this?

Source: fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net